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Grandfathers Story

2wolvesposter-50bAn old Grandfather said to his grandson, who came to him with anger at a friend who had done him an injustice, “Let me tell you a story.”

“I too, at times, have felt a great hate for those that have taken so much, with no sorrow for what they do.”

But hate wears you down, and does not hurt your enemy. It is like taking poison and wishing your enemy would die. I have struggled with these feelings many times.” He continued, “It is as if there are two wolves inside me. One is good and does no harm. He lives in harmony with all around him, and does not take offense when no offense was intended. He will only fight when it is right to do so, and in the right way.

But the other wolf, ah! He is full of anger. The littlest thing will set him into a fit of temper. He fights everyone, all the time, for no reason. He cannot think because his anger and hate are so great. It is helpless anger,for his anger will change nothing.

Sometimes, it is hard to live with these two wolves inside me, for both of them try to dominate my spirit.”

The boy looked intently into his Grandfather’s eyes and asked, “Which one wins, Grandfather?”

The Grandfather smiled and quietly said, “The one I feed.”

Bubba wins in New York

His name was Bubba, he was from Georgia…and he needed a loan. So he walked into a bank in New York City and asked for the loan officer. He told the loan officer that he was going to Paris for an International Redneck festival for two weeks and needed to borrow $5,000 and that he was not a depositor of the bank.
The bank officer Told him that the bank would need some form of security for the loan, so the Redneck handed over the keys to a new Ferrari. The car was parked on the street in front of the bank. The Redneck produced the title and everything checked out. The loan officer Agreed to hold the car as collateral for the loan and apologized for having To charge 12% interest.
Later, the bank’s president and its officers all enjoyed a good laugh at the Redneck from the South for using a $250,000 Ferrari as collateral for a $5,000 loan. An employee of the bank then drove the Ferrari Into the bank’s private underground garage and parked it.
Two weeks later, the Redneck returned, repaid the $5,000 and the interest of $23.07.
The loan officer said, “Sir, we are very happy to have had your business, and this transaction has worked out very nicely, but we are a little puzzled.
While you were away, we checked you out on Dunn & Bradstreet and found that You are a Distinguished Alumni from the University of Georgia, a highly sophisticated investor and Multi-Millionaire with real estate and Financial interests all over the world.
Your investments include a large number of wind turbines around Sweetwater, Texas. What puzzles us is, why would you bother to borrow $5,000?” 

The good ‘ole boy replied, “Where else in New York City can I park my car for two weeks for only $23.07 and expect it to be there when I return?”

His name was Bubba…keep an eye on those southern boys! Just because we talk funny does not mean we are stupid.

Socialism- Explained

A LESSON ON HOW WELL SOCIALISM WORKS!!!!

An economics professor at a local college made a statement that he had never failed a single student before, but had recently failed an entire class. That class had insisted that Obama’s socialism worked and that no one would be poor and no one would be rich, a great equalizer.

The professor then said, “OK, we will have an experiment in this class on Obama’s plan”..
All grades would be averaged and everyone would receive the same grade so no one would fail and no one would receive an A….

After the first test, the grades were averaged and everyone got a B. The students who studied hard were upset and the students who studied little were happy. As the second test rolled around, the students who studied little had studied even less and the ones who studied hard decided they wanted a free ride too so they studied little.

The second test average was a D! No one was happy.
When the 3rd test rolled around, the average was an F.

As the tests proceeded, the scores never increased as bickering, blame and name-calling all resulted in hard feelings and no one would study for the benefit of anyone else.

All failed, to their great surprise, and the professor told them that socialism would also ultimately fail because when the reward is great, the effort to succeed is great, but when government takes all the reward away, no one will try or want to succeed.
Could not be any simpler than that. (Please pass this on)
Remember, there is a test coming up. The 2012 elections.

ARE YOU A CARROT, AN EGG, OR A COFFEE BEAN?

Carrot, Egg or Coffee? 

 

A young woman went to her mother and told her about her life and how things were so hard for her. She did not know how she was going to make it and wanted to give up. She was tired of fighting and struggling. It seemed as one problem was solved a new one arose.
Her mother took her to the kitchen. She filled three pots with water. In the first, she placed carrots, in the second she placed eggs and the last she placed ground coffee beans. She let them sit and boil without saying a word.
In about twenty minutes she turned off the burners. She fished the carrots out and placed them in a bowl. She pulled the eggs out and placed them in a bowl. Then she ladled the coffee out and placed it in a bowl. Turning to her daughter, she asked, “Tell me what do you see?”
“Carrots, eggs, and coffee,” she replied.

She brought her closer and asked her to feel the carrots. She did and noted that they got soft.She then asked her to take an egg and break it.
After pulling off the shell, she observed the hard-boiled egg.
Finally, she asked her to sip the coffee. The daughter smiled, as she tasted its rich aroma. The daughter then asked. “What’s the point, mother?”
Her mother explained that each of these objects had faced the same adversity–boiling water–but each reacted differently.
The carrot went in strong, hard and unrelenting. However after being subjected to the boiling water, it softened and became weak. The egg had been fragile. Its thin outer shell had protected its liquid interior. But, after sitting through the boiling water, its inside became hardened.
The ground coffee beans were unique, however. After they were in the boiling water they had changed the water.
“Which are you?” she asked her daughter. “When adversity knocks on your door, how do you respond? Are you a carrot, an egg, or a coffee bean?”
Think of this: Which am I?
Am I the carrot that seems strong, but with pain and adversity, do I wilt and become soft and lose my strength?
Am I the egg that starts with a malleable heart, but changes with the heat? Did I have a fluid spirit, but after a death, a breakup, a financial hardship or some other trial, have I become hardened and stiff?
Does my shell look the same, but on the inside am I bitter and tough with a stiff spirit and a hardened heart?
Or am I like the coffee bean? The bean actually changes the hot water, the very circumstance that brings the pain. When the water gets hot, it releases the fragrance and flavor. If you are like the bean, when things are at their worst, you get better and change the situation around you.
When the hours are the darkest and trials are their greatest do you elevate to another level?
How do you handle Adversity? ARE YOU A CARROT, AN EGG, OR A COFFEE BEAN?

~ Scriptor Incompertus

Thermometer or a thermostat?

ARE YOU A THERMOMETER … OR A THERMOSTAT?

In most every office, home and business you can easily find that small, yet familiar, unit that hangs on the wall as it determines our level of comfort. Within this apparatus you’ll find two critical components—a thermometer and a thermostat.

ThermometerWhen you stop and think about it, we can be very much like either of those components. Which one are you? Think about it—a thermometer measures the temperature. A thermostat changes the temperature. One tells about the conditions surrounding it while the other makes a difference in those conditions in the environment where it is located.

Isn’t that very much like the choices we face day in and day out? Upon further examination, you must admit that just about anyone can describe a situation or complain about a problem. In fact, a lot of people do just that on a regular basis. Let’s be honest, it’s not too difficult to be a thermometer.

However, in our role as leaders at any level, it’s our responsibility to make a difference in the atmosphere in which we exist. We’re expected to be condition changers—we’re thermostats … not thermometers!

Your family, friends and associates appreciate someone who is under control, who doesn’t succumb to stress, who’s steady and reliable. Those thermostat people are rare—and valuable.

ThermostatsIt takes courage to make the move from a thermometer to a thermostat—one who has the inner power to set a new direction. Perhaps, the greatest challenge that you will ever face is developing the courage that brings you an unshakable self-confidence. Fortunately, developing courage can be learned and even enhanced—it just takes practice.

Strive constantly to develop and strengthen two habits which will serve you well in your quest for success:

Habit 1:
Perhaps, the most important kind of courage is the courage to begin, to launch, to take that initial step toward your goal. The future belongs to the risk takers, not the security seekers. The more you seek opportunity, the more likely you will achieve the security you desire. Plan and prepare thoroughly in advance. Be proactive. Set clear goals and objectives, and then gather information. Read and research your chosen field of endeavor.

Habit 2:
Develop the courage to endure, to persist, to stay at it once you have begun, no matter what. Plan your work and work your plan. Hang in there even in the face of disappointment and unexpected short-term setbacks. Tenacity is a tremendous attribute.

So which will you be … a Thermostat or Thermometer? The choice is yours to make. Choose wisely.

 

Attitude is Everything!!!

Attitude: 

There once was a woman who woke up one morning, looked in the mirror, and noticed she had only three hairs on her head. ‘Well,’ she said, ‘I think I’ll braid my hair today?’ So she did and she had a wonderful day.

The next day she woke up, looked in the mirror and saw that she had only two hairs on her head. ‘H-M-M,’ she said, ‘I think I’ll part my hair down the middle today?’ So she did and she had a grand day.

The next day she woke up, looked in the mirror and noticed that she had only one hair on her head. ‘Well,’ she said, ‘today I’m going to wear my hair in a pony tail.’ So she did and she had a fun, fun day.

The next day she woke up, looked in the mirror and noticed that there wasn’t a single hair on her head. ‘YEA!’ she exclaimed, ‘I don’t have to fix my hair today!’

Attitude is everything. Be kinder than necessary, for everyone you meet is fighting some kind of battle. Live simply, Love generously, Care deeply, Speak kindly…….

Life isn’t about waiting for the storm to pass… It’s about learning to dance in the rain, YES!!!

The Elderly Lady and the Hearing Aid

An old lady had a hearing-aid fitted, hidden underneath her hair.

A week later she returned to the doctor for her check-up.

“It’s wonderful – I can hear everything now,” she reported very happily to the doctor.

“And is your family pleased too?” asked the doctor.

“Oh I haven’t told them yet,” said the old lady, “And I’ve changed my will twice already..”

The Preacher and the Farmer

An old hill farming crofter trudges several miles through freezing snow to his local and very remote chapel for Sunday service. No-one else is there, aside from the clergyman.

“I’m not sure it’s worth proceeding with the service – might we do better to go back to our warm homes and a hot drink?..” asks the clergyman, inviting a mutually helpful reaction from his audience of one.

“Well, I’m just a simple farmer,” says the old crofter, “But when I go to feed my herd, and if only one beast turns up, I sure don’t leave it hungry.”

So the clergyman, feeling somewhat ashamed, delivers his service – all the bells and whistles, hymns and readings, lasting a good couple of hours – finishing proudly with the fresh observation that no matter how small the need, our duty remains. And he thanks the old farmer for the lesson he has learned.

“Was that okay?” asks the clergyman, as the two set off home.

“Well I’m just a simple farmer,” says the old crofter, “But when I go to feed my herd, and if only one beast turns up, I sure don’t force it to eat what I brought for the whole herd…”

From which we see the extra lesson, that while our duty remains regardless of the level of need, we have the additional responsibility to ensure that we adapt our delivery (of whatever is our stock in trade) according to the requirements of our audience.

Another application is the fact that not all that is in our brain must come out of our mouth.


The Blind Men and the Road

A blind man had been waiting a while at a busy road for someone to offer to guide him across, when he felt a tap on his shoulder.

“Excuse me,” said the tapper, “I’m blind – would you mind guiding me across the road?”

The first blind man took the arm of the second blind man, and they both crossed the road.

Apparently this is a true story. The first blind man was the jazz pianist George Shearing. He is quoted (in Bartlett’s Anecdotes) as saying after the event, “What could I do? I took him across and it was the biggest thrill of my life.”

There are times when we think we cannot do something and so do not stretch or take a risk. Being forced to stretch and take a risk can often help us to reduce our dependencies (on others, or our own personal safety mechanisms), and to discover new excitement and capabilities. The poem “Come to the Edge” is another wonderful perspective on risk and stretching.

The Jewels Story

Once there was a very rich and greedy man. He loved and hoarded jewels.

One day a visitor asked to see them.

So the jewels were brought out, amid much expensive security, and the two men gazed at the wonderful stones.

As the visitor was leaving he said, “Thank you for sharing your jewels with me.”

“I didn’t give them to you,” exclaimed the rich man, “They belong to me.”

“Yes of course,” replied the visitor, “And while we enjoyed the jewels just the same, the real difference between us is your trouble and expense of buying and protecting them.”
(Adapted from an original item in New Internationalist 137.)